Performance Test Best Practise

An old colleague asked if there are any standards identifying best practise in performance testing. I could not think of any but it started me thinking about what is best practise. Here are my thoughts on some areas of best practise in Performance Testing. They are NOT in any order of importance and the list is NOT exhaustive.

1.) Have a defined process and constantly refine it.
Before you start you should have a process defined and you should make sure you review this process to add improvements. The process needs to be flexible in order to accomodate different types of projects, from benchmarking a core application through to making sure an e-commerce site can handle the Christmas rush.

2.) Define the Goals up front.
This seems obvious, but you need to understand why are you testing and what the performance goals of the system under test are. (Note I use the word goals not requirements). Here, the move to ITIL may help where service design packages developed early on should include the performance requirements.

3.) Let Risk guide you.
The performance risk and consequences of failure should guide the type and amount of performance testing you do. Don’t just test what is easy to test.

4.) Don’t be afraid to say no.
If you are given responsibility for signing off on the performance of the system, you are the expert. If, subsequently, you are not given enough time or the correct tools then be prepared to say that you cannot test the system adequately. Remember that the caveats you place in your final report may never make it into the summary presented to the management board!

5.) Get the workload right.
If you don’t test the system with the correct workload it won’t matter if everything else is perfect – the results will be wrong. This means you need to understand user behaviours and their frequency. Don’t forget to include error scenarios as well.

6.) Develop Quality Scripts.
Make sure your scripts emulate user behaviour as much as possible and remember that users make mistakes, leave processes early and have comfort breaks! Also, make sure your script check what is returned to the user is what is expected.

7.) Select an appropriate test environment.
Is best practise using a production-sized test environment? Not sure, but make sure your test environment is sized and up to the job involved. Make sure you can collect the necessary data about the performance of that environment during the load test.

8.) Run your performance tests for long enough and often enough.
Make sure your tests are repeatable and that the results they produce are statistically valid.

9.) Participation.
Get all the people that need to be involved in the performance test working togther. Unless you are superhuman and multi-skilled you will need DBAs, administrators, developers, Project Managers, etc., to assist in the test. Remember, for the best results get these stakeholders involved in the process early on.

10.) Remember, people want results not data.
Don’t just present the canned report from the performance test tool; you need to analyse the results and present the key facts of the load test. And remember that different people will want different results from the load test – a manager will want to know if it passed whereas the DBA will want to know if the SGA is sized correctly, for example.

One thought on “Performance Test Best Practise

  1. Adam Fletcher

    Great article, and all these best practices I’ve had to learn the hard way at one point in my career. One more I would add, which is also a central tenant of good debugging:

    * Change only one variable.

    Which can be restated as:

    * Use the scientific method.

    The temptation to tinker is great because often results point a several factors, but this temptation must be resisted. I struggle with this every test 🙂

    Thanks for the post!

    -Adam

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